An autonomous research institute under the Ministry of Finance

 

Events

Conference

Papers in Public Economics and Policy (PPEP)

  • Date Thu, 26 March, 2020 - Fri, 27 March, 2020
  • Venue Auditorium and Conference Hall, NIPFP
  • Details
    The National Institute of Public Finance and Policy (NIPFP) has initiated a lecture series and an annual conference on “Papers in Public Economics and Policy”, in honour of Dr.Raja J.Chelliah.  The seventh event in this series is being organized on 26-27th of March, 2020, at New Delhi.  Dr. Kaushik Basu, C Marks Professor of International Studies, Cornell University, has kindly agreed to deliver the Memorial Lecture.  Papers on issues broadly in the area of Public Economics and Policy can be submitted for the conference.  Papers received would be subject to review.  Accepted papers may be published after suitable revision as working paper of NIPFP.  For all accepted papers, the Institute will reimburse travel expenses and take care of local logistics.  
     
    Submission of full Paper: 31st January, 2020
     
    Authors of accepted papers would be intimated by the middle of February 2020
     
    The full papers should be sent in soft copy to       : ppep@nipfp.org.in 
     
    Any other communication regarding the Conference can also be addressed to dinesh.nayak@nipfp.org.in or alka.matta@nipfp.org.in 
     
  • Schedule
  • Contact email alka.matta@nipfp.org.in

Seminar

The Brexit Meltdown: Populism and the Dynamics of Global Decline

  • Speaker Prof. David Long
  • Speaker profile
    Dr. David Long is Professor of International Affairs and Associate Director of the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. He has published widely on the history of international theory and on the foreign policy of the European Union. He is a past president of the European Community Studies Association-Canada.
  • Date Fri, 17 January, 2020
  • Time 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
  • Venue Conference Room, Ground Floor, R&T Building, NIPFP
  • Abstract
    Among the many accounts of the reasons and consequences of Brexit for the United Kingdom, nationalist populism is frequently accorded importance. In this paper, I consider the relationship of the rise of populist discourse to the impact of global decline. While populism is a all-too-obvious recent trend in democratic politics, in a number of contexts – whether the US, Russia or even Turkey – it is associated both materially and ideationally with notions of a glorious past, a less than satisfactory present, and the looming unknown of the future. The paper will unpack the discourse of decline and examine the rhetorical device where the people ‘take back control’ and ‘make great again’, to use but two populist catchphrases.
  • Contact email nipfp.seminar@nipfp.org.in

Seminar

The Trilemma of Gender Based Analysis

  • Speaker Prof. Frances Woolley
  • Speaker profile
    I am a Professor of Economics at Carleton University, cross appointed to the School of Public Policy. My research centres on families and public policy. My most-cited work is on modelling family-decision making, measuring inequality within the household, feminist economics, and tax-benefit policy towards families. Recently I have devoted more time to social media and popular writing, primarily for Worthwhile Canadian Initiative and the Globe and Mail.
     
    My twitter profile says “I theorize about life.” I delight in using economics to explain everyday experience, and in sharing that passion with my students. I also have an on-going commitment to professional service, having served as Secretary Treasurer and also President of the Canadian Economics Association, co-editor of Review of Economics of the Household, on the editorial boards of Feminist Economics and the Journal of Socio-Economics and as Associate Dean of the Faculty of Public Affairs at Carleton University.
     
    I hold a BA from Simon Fraser University, an MA from Queen’s, and completed my doctorate at the London School of Economics, under the supervision of Tony Atkinson.
  • Date Thu, 16 January, 2020
  • Time 03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
  • Venue Conference Room, Ground Floor, R&T Building, NIPFP
  • Abstract
    In 2016, Canada’s the newly elected Trudeau government set out a Gender Based Analysis Plus action plan, with the plus referring to intersectionality. GBA+ capacity was increased, and conducting GBA+ became a higher priority throughout government. In 2018 the Canadian Gender Budgeting Act was passed, enshrining gender budgeting as official government policy. In 2019 the federal budget, for the first time, contained a gendered analysis of all new budget initiatives. 
     
    In this paper we use the Canadian experience to argue that governments attempting to incorporate GBA+ into the policy process face a trilemma: it is impossible for the GBA+ to be simultaneously complete, open, and politically palatable. A complete GBA+ analysis identifies how policies impact different groups differently: the costs and benefits a policy creates for different groups of men and women. For example, university attendance rates differ substantially between men and women, across regions, and according to ethnic origin and other characteristics. A complete GBA+ analysis of educational policies such as, for example, reducing the interest rates on student loans, would take account such differences in who benefits from the policies, and thus make it clear that some group of people receive, on average, greater benefits from such a policy than others. Yet as soon as it becomes apparent that a policy benefits some groups of people more than others, this fact can be used to mobilize the people who do not benefit from the policy to oppose it. Thus a complete and thorough GBA+ evaluation of policy cannot be made open and transparent, if the government wishes the process to be politically palatable. 
     
    In this paper we explore how the Canadian government’s GBA+ initiative has negotiated the tension between completeness, openness, and political survival. We argue that there is no simple way out of this trilemma, but suggest that having an independent agency responsible for evaluating the GBA+ process is one possible solution. 
  • Contact email nipfp.seminar@nipfp.org.in